Browsing All posts tagged under »Canada ICT policy«

De-Universalizing Access! Is there a Conspiracy to Electronically “Kettle” the Poor in Digital Dead Zones and What This Means for the Social Contract?

June 3, 2012

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Is there a conspiracy to “kettle” the poor, the marginalized, the socially excluded in digital dead zones and use this to deny them access to social benefits?

Gmail Hell, Day 4: Dealing with the Borg (Or “Being Evil” Without Really Thinking About It

February 25, 2012

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I'm an email guy. I live (and live and maybe one day I'll die) with email...

Measuring the Unmeasurable (Internet) and Why It Matters

September 25, 2011

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perhaps of greatest significance from the perspective of Civil Society and of communities is the overall absence of measurement and thus inclusion in the economic accounting of the value of the contributions provided to, through and on the Internet of various voluntary and not-for-profit initiatives and activities

“Measuring the Internet Economy” from a Civil Society Perspective

September 1, 2011

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Among other things I’m involved in a variety of discussions in several venues on Civil Society and the Internet. This below is part of my contribution to one of those discussions and specifically on how to “measure the Internet economy” in this instance from a Civil Society perspective. One of the basic understandings of the […]

Ten Information and Communications Technology Issues That Should Be Discussed During the Canadian General Election (But Probably Won`t)

March 28, 2011

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Michael Geist, a frequent commentator on Canadian telecom and Information and Communication Technology related policy issues, has provided a list of issues he would like to see addressed in Canada`s upcoming national election. On looking at his list, especially in light of what I consider to be the major (policy and other) deficiencies in Canada`s […]

Is Facebook a Human Right? Egypt and Tunisia Transform Social Media

February 4, 2011

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That there will be many impacts some profound, many geo-political, even more unanticipated may be taken as a given. However, perhaps we received a signal of what may be one of the be the most important of all as it will potentially impact the way in which our world creates values and works towards an implementation of our highest aspirations. If such an impact is occurring then the effect will not simply change how we do and can behave but also how our technologies are defined and determined and perhaps most importantly how our relationship to our technologies acts so as to reinforce our humanity.

WikiLeaks, Open Information and Effective Use: Exploring the Limits of Open Government

December 29, 2010

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Clearly to ensure that “open information” is not a series of “leaks” and ensuing scandals or becomes a form of information based cooptation and manipulation, those advocating for “open information” and those who are agreeable to providing it must provide a framing and contextualizing as effective use which goes much beyond anything provided by WikiLeaks in partnership with its press collaborators or beyond simply making various statistical runs or information files available to public users.

Community Informatics and the Economist Intelligence Unit: From a Digital Economy to a Digital Society: A Response to the Canadian Digital Economy Consultation (2)

July 3, 2010

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It would be great but perhaps unrealistic to expect that any of those with responsibility in the Canadian Digital Economy policy consultation reading my earlier blogpost on that subject. But perhaps one could hope that the folks on Parliament Hill might take a look at a report by the very highly regard publication and research […]

From a Digital Economy to a Digital Society: A Response to the Canadian Consultation

June 28, 2010

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The recognition that a digitally enabled and effective economy is founded on a digitally enabled and effective society seems somewhere to have been lost. Lost as well seem to be the recognition that the greatest skill in a digital economy as in any other economy or in society overall is the capacity to learn and that learning how to learn, a function of a broader and more humanistic education rather than a “skills oriented” one, is probably a more important and useful preparation for a digital future overall. Equally lost is an understanding that economic innovation is a subset of broader social innovation which in turn comes from a critical yet practical immersion in prevailing cultures and practices. The response then from a Community Informatics perspective to the questions posed by the Digital Economy Consultation would be as follows

Community Access (CAP), Canada’s Digital Strategy, and Digital Inclusion: From Here to CAP 2.0?

March 18, 2010

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If, as seems likely, the Harper government’s Digital Strategy is presented without any linkages or consideration of its relationship to CAP or the issues which CAP has been attempting to resolve then the victory of blinkered market ideology over commonsense in a digital era will be complete and Canada will slip ever further behind its allies and competitors in these most crucial areas.