Browsing All Posts filed under »Civil Society«

The Leap Manifesto Revised as Though Information Technology and the Internet Matter

April 25, 2016

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  The Leap Manifesto is an important document and one that is having significant impacts at the moment in certain political areas. The document as an attempt to link an environmentalist approach to a broader social and economic critique and a statement on ways forward, breaks new ground in the Canadian context and presents significant […]

The A4AI Discussion: A Summation

April 5, 2016

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As some of you will know my blogpost(1) which presents a detailed critique of the A4AI (the Alliance for an Affordable Internet) “Best Practices” document; and blogpost(2) which presents a detailed alternative set of “Best Practices” were circulated over the last couple of weeks. These have generated quite a lengthy and sometimes heated discussion on […]

Alternative “Best Practices” for the A4AI (to be renamed Alliance for an Accessible Internet)

March 26, 2016

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  My original blogpost examining the “Policy and Regulatory Best Practices” of the Alliance for an Affordable Internet (A4AI’s) has generated some considerable discussion including on the InternetPolicy elist sponsored by the Internet Society (ISOC).  In the course of that discussion a challenge was put forward by a member of that list to articulate an […]

A4AI: Who Could Oppose a More Affordable Internet? The Alliance for an Affordable Internet (A4AI) and the Neo-liberal Stealth Campaign to Control the Internet Throughout the Developing World and Make Big Bucks for the Private Sector While Doing So

March 20, 2016

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When we look even slightly below the surface of this initiative we see what appear to be motivations that are rather less selfless than is being presented. As is very clear from the “Best Practices” which those joining the initiative must sign on to, an underlying motivation would appear to be to impose on LDC's an ideological position for its Internet policy and regulation which conforms to and supports the fundamentalist free market anti-regulatory regime promoted by the USG and certain of its governmental and corporate allies .

From the Digital Divide to Digital Citizenship

November 9, 2015

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Thus "digital citizenship" is a newer and evolved form of citizenship and moreover one which is necessary to and appropriate in the digital age/the Information Society. This new form of citizenship has multiple aspects but for our purposes the two most salient elements are that with this new form of citizenship goes certain rights – at a minimum to be able to have access to and to effectively exercise citizenship rights in a digital age; and on the part of the State the obligation to ensure that the citizen is in a position to exercise their digital citizenship in an appropriate and effective way.

A Canadian Election Programme for Digital Citizenship and Social Equity

September 14, 2015

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In the following I want to lay out what hopefully may function as an initial program towards a “digital citizenship” -- a form of digitally enabled and enhanced citizenship for the Internet age; and one which takes as its basic assumption the Internet's transformational risks and opportunities. This is presented in the form of an election “platform” -- a set of principles and policies which gives citizens a choice as to directions they may wish to follow.

Another Example of “Multistakeholder Governance” in Action: The Global CyberSpace 15 “Unicorn”

April 19, 2015

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So I think that we can assume that the GCCS is meant to be one of that increasing stable of multistakeholder global Internet Governance unicorns whose intention is to replace more formal and “democratically constituted” global Internet Governance assemblies and processes. (It might be noted in passing that, the Chairman’s Report while mentioning “stakeholders” and “multistakeholders” as a central element of Internet governance 24 times (in a nine page document), failed to mention “democracy” or “democratic processes” even once.)